Math-Phys Joint Seminar

Seminar

Math-Phys Joint Seminar

Self-adjoint extension in quantum mechanics and non-Rydberg spectra of one-dimensional hydrogen atom

April 13 at 16:00 - 18:10, 2021

Prof. Takuju Zen (Professor, School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Kochi University of Technology)

We offer a beginner’s guide to the functional-analytical techniques in quantum mechanics, and cover its application to the 1D Coulomb problem. It is shown that the wave function at the diverging point of the Coulomb potential is mathematically described by three-parameter family of generalized connection conditions. A scheme is devised to physically implement the generalized conditions, which provides the way to experimentally realize non-Rydberg spectra in 1D Hydrogen atom. Schedule: Part 1, Self-adjoint extension of Hilbert space operator Part 2, 1D Coulomb problem

Venue: via Zoom

Event Official Language: English

Seminar

Math-Phys Joint Seminar

Non-perturbative tests of duality cascades in three dimensional supersymmetric gauge theories

December 14 at 16:00 - 18:10, 2020

Dr. Naotaka Kubo (Postdoctoral Researcher, Yukawa Institute for Theoretical Physics, Kyoto University)

M2-brane is an interesting object in M-theory and string theory. A three-dimensional 𝒩=6 super conformal Chern Simons theory with gauge group U(𝑁1)×𝑈(𝑁2), called ABJ theory, describes the low energy behavior of M2-brane On the one hand, it has been considered that when |𝑁1−𝑁2| is larger than the absolute value of Chern Simons level, the supersymmetry is broken. On the other hand, it was predicted that an interesting phenomenon called duality cascade occurs, and supersymmetry is not broken in some cases. Motivated by this situation, we performed non-perturbative tests by focusing on the partitionfunction on 𝑆3. The result strongly suggests that the duality cascade indeed occurs. We also proposed that the duality cascade occurs in theories with more general gauge groups and we performed non-perturbative tests in the same way. I will review and explain our physical prediction in the first half of my talk. In the second half of my talk , I will explain the non-perturbative tests . This part is mathematical because the partition function reduces to a matrix model by using the supersymmetric localization technique.

Venue: via Zoom

Event Official Language: English

Seminar

Math-Phys Joint Seminar

Mathematics of thermalization in isolated quantum systems

November 10 at 16:00 - 18:10, 2020

Dr. Naoto Shiraishi (assistant professor, Faculty of Science Department of Physics, Gakushuin University)

If an isolated macroscopic quantum system is left at a nonequilibrium state, then this system will relax to the unique equilibrium state, which is called thermalization. Most of quantum many-body systems thermalize, while some many-body systems including integrable systems do not thermalize. What determines the presence/absence of thermalization and how to understand thermalization from microscopic quantum mechanics are profound long-standing problems. In the first part of my talk, I briefly review some established results of quantum thermalization. I first clarify the problem of thermalization in a mathematical manner, and then introduce several important results and insights: typicality of equilibrium states [1], relaxation caused by large effective dimension [2], and eigenstate thermalization hypothesis (ETH) [3,4] and weak-ETH [5]. In the second part of my talk, I explain some of my results. First, I introduce a model which is non-integrable and thermalizes but does not satisfy the ETH [6,7]. This finding disproves the conjectures that all nonintegrable systems satisfy the ETH and that the ETH is a necessary condition for thermalization. I also discuss the hardness of the problem of thermalization from the viewpoint of computational science [8]. Then, I move to an analytical approach to a concrete model, and prove that S=1/2 XYZ chain with a magnetic field is nonintegrable [9]. This is the first example of proof of nonintegrability in a concrete quantum many-body system, which will help a mathematical approach to thermalization.

Venue: via Zoom

Event Official Language: English

Seminar

Math-Phys Joint Seminar

TQFT, integrable lattice model, and quiver gauge theories

October 2 at 16:00 - 18:00, 2020

Dr. Toshihiro Ota (Student Trainee, iTHEMS / Graduate School of Science, Osaka University School of Science)

- 1st part (math): In physics literature, “lattice models” appear quite often as mathematical models of physical systems, e.g. Ising model, vertex models, lattice gauge theory. The aim of the 1st part is to introduce ‘what is (T)QFT,’ ‘what is lattice model,’ and ‘what does integrability mean’ in the language of mathematics. In turn, they will play a crucial role in the 2nd part of my talk. I also hope that this will lead to a good exchange among us, especially between physicists and mathematicians. - 2nd part (physics): In the 2nd part, I would like to explain where an integrable lattice model may come from, especially for people in the physics background. I will show a certain class of integrable lattice models is realized by Wilson-’t Hooft lines in 4d quiver gauge theories. I will also explain a bit how these gauge theories are constructed from brane configurations in string theory. String dualities allow us to relate the original 4d setups to 4d partially topological Chern-Simons theory, which is a partial TQFT and generates integrable lattice models.

Venue: via Zoom

Event Official Language: English

Seminar

Math-Phys Joint Seminar

Geometric Perspective for the Theory of Hydrodynamic Limits

August 31 - September 1, 2020

Dr. Makiko Sasada (Associate Professor, Graduate School of Mathematical Sciences, The University of Tokyo)
Prof. Kenichi Bannai (Professor, Faculty of Science and Technology Department of Mathematics, Keio University)

This is a series of lectures on "Geometric Perspectives for Fluid Dynamic Limit Theory" by the following speakers: [DAY 1: Aug 31] Dr. Makiko Sasada (University of Tokyo) [DAY 2: Sept 1] Prof. Kenichi Bannai (Keio University) Abstract: One of the fundamental problems in the natural and social sciences is to explain macroscopic phenomena that we can observe from the rules governing the microscopic system giving rise to the phenomena. Hydrodynamic limit provides a rigorous mathematical method to derive the deterministic partial differential equations describing the time evolution of macroscopic parameters, from the stochastic dynamics of a microscopic large scale interacting system. In the article "Topological Structures of Large Scale Interacting Systems via Uniform Locality" joint with Yukio Kametani, we introduce a general framework encompassing a wide variety of interacting systems in order to systematically investigate various microscopic stochastic large scale interacting systems in a unified fashion. In particular, we introduced a new cohomology theory called the uniformly local cohomology to investigate the underlying geometry of the interacting system. Our theory gives a new interpretation of the macroscopic parameters, the role played by the group action on the microscopic system, and the origin of the diffusion matrix associated to the macroscopic deterministic partial differential equation obtained via the space-time scaling limit of the microscopic system. The purpose of the series of lectures is to introduce to the audience the theory of hydrodynamic limits, especially the relation between the macroscopic observables and the microscopic interacting system. We then explain our new perspective of how geometry comes into play in investigating the interacting system, and introduce the ideas and results of our article.

Venue: via Zoom

Event Official Language: English